Video Game Review: Lost Sphear

Details: Played on the Nintendo Switch. howlongtobeat.com says that most playthroughs take about thirty-four hours. More information can be found at https://lostsphear.square-enix-games.com/home/

Score: 6.4/10

Lost Sphear is the follow up game to the mostly successful I Am Setsuna. The goal of both games were to recreate the feeling of old fashioned Japanese role playing games.

The biggest issue I have with this game is that the game was boring until about halfway through. Keep in mind that the game averages to about thirty-four hours per playthrough, so to get to the interesting part, you’d have to get through about seventeen hours of boring stuff just to get to some stuff that isn’t that boring. It’s a big ask for a player and I’m not sure it’s worth it.

Lost Sphear takes place in a fantasy world of magic and monsters. You play a young boy named Kanata. When people in the world start disappearing and becoming “lost,” Kanata must now use his new found power to restore them and tackle a threat that seeks to destroy the world.

It’s a deliberately generic role playing game story that mimics the basic story structure of most Final Fantasy games. As said above, my biggest issue with this game is that the story is mundane until about seventeen hours into it. That’s a lot to ask of players to deal with before the game gets good. Even when the story gets good, it merely becomes tolerable from when it was intolerable. By the end of the game, I did find myself enjoying what was happening, but not enjoying half of the game was a lot for me to deal with.

Gameplay is a lot like I Am Setsuna, but with improvements. It was as if they listened to all the complaints fans had with I Am Setsuna and then published a patch which addressed them all. It’s not big changes, but many small changes which improve the experience overall.

Other than these small improvements, the gameplay is almost identical to I Am Setsuna. You explore a world map with smaller areas that you can further explore littered throughout the world. Enemies exist throughout the world and if you walk into them, you start a battle. The battle system uses the well known active time battle system. All this means is that each character in the battle has a bar that fills in real time. When the bar is filled, you get to take an action. An action can be attacking, casting spells, using items, etc. All characters have health bars and the goal of battles is to whittle down an enemy’s health bar before they whittle yours down.

This is all standard stuff. Again, this game seeks to emulate old Japanese role playing games. There are a number of new systems though that worth discussing.

First is the Vulcosuits. Basically, during a battle, you can morph into a mech robot that increases your power and gives you some new abilities. The problem with these Vulcosuits is that they don’t really become useful until much later in the game when you have more artifacts.

Artifacts are places on the world map that you can restore with Kanata’s power. Each artifact gives you a passive ability, like improving the duration of Vulcosuits, increasing damage providing a minimap in the top left corner. Many of the artifacts later in the game improve the use of Vulcosuits and without these artifacts, the Vulcosuits are mostly useless time wasters.

Altogether, the gameplay in this game is unoriginal, but satsifactory.

The visuals in the game are its weakest aspect. The game looks like it was designed for smart phones, from the menu’s to the layout of the world. It is not a pretty game and lacks much of the art direction that made I Am Setsuna so appealing. Lost Sphear looks cheaper. In a role playing game, presentation is everything and the presentation here isn’t great.

The music is fine. There’s not voice acting other than random quips made during battle. Also, all the quips are in Japanese since they didn’t bother recording English versions.

Overall, this game isn’t great. It isn’t terrible either. However, I do not recommend this game because it wasted so much of my time before becoming tolerably interesting. This game just isn’t worth the time.